Free erotic cameras dating - Carbon dating flaws dinosaurs

In the closing speech that Moses makes to the people, he says if you want to see the fingerprint of God in the universe, "consider the days of old, the years of the many generations" (Deut.

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Was it, as the Bible might imply, 5700-plus years, or was it the 15 billions of years that's accepted by the scientific community?

The first thing we have to understand is the origin of the Biblical calendar.

The Jewish year is figured by adding up the generations since Adam. On Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, upon blowing the shofar, the following sentence is said: "Hayom Harat Olam ― today is the birthday of the world." This verse might imply that Rosh Hashanah commemorates the creation of the universe. Rosh Hashanah commemorate the creation of the Neshama, the soul of human life.

Additionally, there are six days leading up to the creation to Adam. We start counting our 5700-plus years from the creation of the soul of Adam.

One of the most obvious perceived contradictions between Torah and science is the age of the universe.

Is it billions of years old, like scientific data, or is it thousands of years, like Biblical data?Universe with a Beginning In 1959, a survey was taken of leading American scientists.Among the many questions asked was, "What is your concept of the age of the universe?When we add up the generations of the Bible, we come to 5700-plus years. God could have put the fossils in the ground and juggled the light arriving from distant galaxies to make the world appear to be billions of years old. God being infinite could have made the world that way. In trying to resolve this apparent conflict, it's interesting to look historically at trends in knowledge, because absolute proofs are not forthcoming.Whereas, data from the Hubble telescope or from the land based telescopes in Hawaii, indicate the age at about 15 billion years. There is another possible approach that also agrees with the ancient commentators’ description of God and nature. But what is available is to look at how science has changed its picture of the world, relative to the unchanging picture of the Torah.The idea of looking for a deeper meaning in Torah is no different than looking for deeper meaning in science.

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