Book dating for dummies

Image on Glass Dating ambrotype photographs is fairly easy for genealogists.

This allowed the negative-looking bare image to appear as a positive.

The ambrotype was packaged in the same manner as the daguerreotype, encased with a mat, top glass, and preserver; and then placed in a case. While the ambrotype is typically cased like a daguerreotype, it does not exhibit the same look. Rotating the image will not cause the image to reflect like a mirror or look like a negative.

From 1859 onward, the preserver exhibited elaborate designs, with bulges at the corners and in the middle of the edges.

There are three different glass examples in the ambrotype.

See the Photographers used many of the same pieces and methods for packaging an ambrotype as they did for the daguerreotype (see Daguerreotype page).

Nearly all ambrotypes will have a preserver (if the packaging is original).

Even the softest camera lens brush will scratch the delicate surface.

At best use compressed air to remove loose dust or particles.

Note: Don't mistake the reflection of the cover glass to be the mirror look.

If the image is out of the case, you will be able to confirm the nature of the photograph.

This and other characteristics will help you in dating ambrotypes.

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